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Oidium or powdery mildew of the vine

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Published by University of California, College of Agriculture, Agricultural Experiment Station in Berkeley, Calif .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Powdery mildew diseases,
  • Grapes,
  • Diseases and pests

Book details:

Edition Notes

Statementby Frederic T. Bioletti and F.C.H. Flossfeder
SeriesCircular / University of California, College of Agriculture, Agricultural Experiment Station -- no. 144, Circular (California Agricultural Experiment Station) -- 144.
ContributionsFlossfeder, F. C. H. (Friedrich Carl Herman)
The Physical Object
Pagination12 p. :
Number of Pages12
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL25240436M

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Free 2-day shipping on qualified orders over $ Buy Oidium or Powdery Mildew of the Vine at nd: Frederic T Bioletti. texts All Books All Texts latest This Just In Smithsonian Libraries FEDLINK (US) Genealogy Lincoln Collection. National Emergency Library. Top American Libraries Canadian Libraries Universal Library Community Texts Project Gutenberg Biodiversity Heritage Library Children's Library. Open Library. Sonoma County Library > Biblioteca Vinaria Sonoma > Oidium or powdery mildew of the vine Text / Oidium or powdery mildew of the vine. Read item on contributor's website. × Get Citation. We recommend you include the following information in your citation. Powdery Mildew Of The Vine (Uncinula Spiralis) This very destructive disease was first noticed in a vinery at Margate in , and within a very few years it had invaded Europe, Syria, Asia Minor, and Algeria, and, as usual on the first introduction of a new disease, caused very serious injury for some years.

Grapevine powdery mildew is a widespread fungal disease. On unprotected, susceptible varieties it can cause crop loss and reduced fruit quality, wine quality and vine growth. The disease varies in severity from season to season, but generally requires treatment every season. Oidium is also known as 'powdery mildew' and mildew as 'downy mildew'. Fungi of this kind appear on the back of the leaves (abaxially). These fungi can usually be recognised because some whitish, grey or pink-hued marks appear on the leaves as .   Oidium is variously referred to as a fungal spore, which is the offspring body of a fungus, or as an actual fungi itself of the Ascomycota order. It is more commonly known as powdery mildew due to its parasitic nature of existing as a soft film on the surface of host plants such as grape vines. Increase your understanding of powdery mildew fungi and the plant diseases they cause with the new book The Powdery Mildews: A Comprehensive Treatise. This valuable new reference work conveys the substantial scientific advances made since the first and only book on the subject, The Powdery Mildews edited by D.M. Spencer, was published in Cited by:

The Powdery Mildew, or oidium, of the vine is native to the Old World, originating on native plants in Japan. It was at one time erroneously held that this disease, like Black Rot and Downy Mildew, originated on wild vines of the eastern and central United States. Unlike most fungal pathogens, powdery mildew fungi tend to grow superficially, or epiphytically, on plant surfaces. During the growing season, hyphae are produced on both upper and lower leaf surfaces, although some species are restricted to one leaf surface only. Infections can also occur on stems, flowers, or fruit. Oidium is also known as “powdery mildew” and mildew as “downy mildew”. Fungi of this kind appear on the back of the leaves (abaxially). These fungi can usually be recognized because some whitish, gray or pink-hued marks appear on the leaves as . Uncinula necator (syn. Erysiphe necator) is a fungus that causes powdery mildew of grape. It is a common pathogen of Vitis species, including the wine grape, Vitis vinifera. The fungus is believed to have originated in North America. European varieties of Vitis vinifera are more or less susceptible to this : Erysiphaceae.