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Rhetorical figures in science

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Published by Oxford University Press in New York .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Figures of speech.,
  • Scientific literature

Book details:

Edition Notes

Includes bibliographical references (p. 215-225) and index.

StatementJeanne Fahnestock.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsPN227 .F34 1999
The Physical Object
Paginationxiv, 234 p. ;
Number of Pages234
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL366379M
ISBN 100195117506
LC Control Number98026832

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  Rhetorical figures in science is a book with many virtues: a compelling case for figures as arguments; a superb history of figuration, which brings it into revealing alignment with topoi and enthymemes; a series of excellent to stunning critical readings; and one of the most astute and lucid readings of Aristotle's corpus in years5/5(1). Rhetorical Figures in Science breaks new ground in the rhetorical study of scientific argument as the first book to demonstrate how figures of speech other than metaphor have been used to accomplish key conceptual moves in scientific texts. Examples, both verbal and visual, range across disciplines and centuries to reaffirm the positive value of these once widely-taught devices.   Rhetorical Figures in Science breaks new ground in the rhetorical study of scientific argument as the first book to demonstrate how figures of speech other than metaphor have been used to accomplish key conceptual moves in scientific texts. Rhetorical Figures in Science breaks new ground in the rhetorical study of scientific argument as the first book to demonstrate how figures of speech other than metaphor have been used to accomplish key conceptual moves in scientific texts.

The ubiquity of the Internet and digital technology has changed the sites of rhetorical discourse and inquiry, as well as the methods by which such analyses are performed. This special issue discusses the state of rhetoric of science and technology at the beginning of the twenty-first century. While many books connecting rhetorical theory to the Internet have paved the way for more refined and. Rhetorician Jeanne Fahnestock has addressed how figures and tropes work as lines of argument in her book Rhetorical Figures in Science. Fahnestock says that it may seem unusual, but readers can identify certain rhetorical figures with “forms of argument or reasons” that traditionally were the “topics”–or topoi–of classical. Hidden Figures begins during World War II and takes place largely during the Cold War era, when the Soviet Union and the United States engaged in a nuclear arms race and competed to be the first nation to master spaceflight. During this time, the United States government poured money into science and technology that could help the war effort (such as fighter jets) and lend the country. Alan Gross applies the principles of rhetoric to the interpretation of classical and contemporary scientific texts to show how they persuade both author and audience. This invigorating consideration of the ways in which scientists--from Copernicus to Darwin to Newton to James Watson--establish authority and convince one another and us of the truth they describe may very well lead to a.

List of important rhetorical figures. ALLITERATION (Paranomeon): a series of words which frequently use the same letter, usually at the beginning of successive sedens super arma (Vergil, Aeneid 1. ) sola mihi tales casus Cassandra canebat (3. ) vi victa vis vel potius oppressa virtute audacia est (Cicero Milone 29): ASSONANCE. Rhetoric of science is a practice of suasion that is an outgrowth of some of the canons of rhetoric. History Since , rhetoric of science, as a field involving rhetoricians, flourished. This flourishing of scholarly activity contributed to a shift in the image of science that was taking place (Harris "Intro," Landmark xv). A conservative. Stylistic Sandcastles: Rhetorical Figures as Composition’s Bucket and Spade. William FitzGerald. Rutgers. For all a rhetorician’s rules teach nothing but to name his tools. — Samuel Butler, Hudibras. Aposiopesis? Metalepsis? Zeugma? What did my students think when first introduced to these and other terms? I know because they told me. Rhetoric of science is a body of scholarly literature exploring the notion that the practice of science is a rhetorical activity. It emerged following a number of similarly-oriented disciplines during the late 20th century, including the disciplines of sociology of scientific knowledge, history of science, and philosophy of science, but it is practiced most fully by rhetoricians in departments.